27 Main St. County Road 8
Elgin, ON K0G 1E0
Phone: 613 359-5555
Fax: 613 359-6329

Embalming

Embalming and or some type of preservation, has been recorded in history as far back as the Egyptians. Back in those days, only the wealthy were embalmed or mummified, as it was known then. And history has shown that the Egyptian mummies were well preserved for thousands of years. Over the years the procedure has changed many times to what we now know as modern day embalming.

We use embalming today for two primary reasons--to allow adequate time between death and burial to observe social customs such as visitations and funeral services, and to prevent the spread of infection. Cosmetic work is often used for aesthetic reasons.

Embalming basically is the complete preservation, disenfection, sanitation and restoration of a deceased human remains. This procedure allows the family and friends to view the body and pay last respects during the funeral process. Many health professionals will declare that viewing the deceased has very positive therapeutic value and will help with the grieving process.

Embalming is not required by law for immediate identification of the remains. The procedure does become law when the remains are being shipped by common carrier (i.e. plane, train, etc.) or when the remains is being transported across international borders. It becomes funeral home policy to have the remains embalmed, if the remains are being held within the funeral home facility for longer that 48 hours for some reason (i.e. spring burial, waiting for a relative to travel from a distance and demands to view the remains).

WHY DO WE EMBALM?

Embalming is primarily done to disinfect and preserve the remains. Disinfection is important for all who have to handle the remains, and for the public safety of our communities. In the years gone by, deaths due to Typhoid Fever, Malaria and other highly contagious diseases, put funeral directors and others who came into contact with the remains at a very high risk of contracting the same disease. Secondly, it has been a tradition to have a period of visitation of the remains. This is known as the wake or visitation. Friends and family gather to view the remains and pay tribute to a family member or friend that has died. We gather to console the family on their loss, and to express sympathy to them. Without embalming, most remains become un-viewable within a short time. There are constant changes going on chemically and physically within the remains that change the looks and other qualities that we are accustomed to seeing. Embalming acts as a hindrance to this, and gives us the time needed to pay our respects and express our sympathies.

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